Beginners Guide to Choosing the Perfect Pool Cue

From being a spectator to playing the billiards, is that possible? Having a necessary background in the game is essential and a significant step to being a great player. But where do you start? The thought of playing the billiards is simple, unlike really playing.

Before you become a pro, you expect to start by owning a pool cue as a beginner. However, pool cues vary with personal preference and level of expertise. But, worry not. Here’s a guide to choosing the perfect cue for a beginner. But first;

Why Do You Need Own Pool Cue?

Own pool cue enables you to familiarise with it and define an excellent feel for its performance. You will learn the tricks and strategies of striking with your pool cue. Therefore playing with your pool cue enables you to see immediate benefits and accelerates your journey of becoming a pro. But not just any cue will do this. Invest in high-quality pool cues from alamobilliards.com to have the freedom and wide selection of your preference.

Length

An ideal cue should be perfectly straight and fit in the arm of the player. The right length will determine your control and aim of hitting the ball, as explained at artisanmarket.org.

Moreover, your height should be directly proportional to the length of the pool cue. There’s no way a short person will use a very long cue and expect great results from the game. For instance, a player of about 5feet and 8 inches- 6 feet and 5 inches should own a standard-sized pool cue of 58 inches. Anyone taller or shorter than that length should opt for the same size as their height.

Be very cautious about the cue’s straightness to buy, for any type even if it’s a two-piece cue. At times one piece may seem bent; hence not ideal for use.

Weight

The typical weight of an ideal pool cue ranges between 17-21ounces. Therefore, choose one that you are comfortable within that range. Most players, though, select 19 and 21 ounces. The weight of a cue settles more on the thicker end. If you feel that end is more massive, then you should get a lighter cue. Furthermore, short people should buy a lighter cue as it would be easier for them to navigate in aiming.

For pros, weight depends on different shots. More massive cues are for breaking shots, while lighter cues for skill shots.

Wrap Type

Pool cues come wrapped in leather, linen, or bare at the holding part. When choosing a wrap type, bear in mind;

  • Grip it offers
  • How you sweat
  • Durability

With that in mind, test each cue to get a feel of how the wrap feels in your hands.

Tip

The cue tip is a very vital part of a pool cue. It’s the point that comes into contact with the ball when striking. Hence it’s essential to choose a tip that will last and adapt to your style of playing. However, different tips are for various shots and purpose.

For instance, a soft tip is not long lasting and can misshape in a short while. But, it is perfect for spin shots. Conversely, a hard tip lasts longer but not ideal for spin shots. Therefore a blend of the two gives an excellent medium tip for a perfect game. But if you get to the pro stage, you will realize that you will need different tips for different shots.

Casing

The casing is the cover, and it is perfect for the safety of your pool cue. Purchase a pool cue from a store that offers an ideal casing for different cues. A perfect container should have separate points for the shaft and butt. A hard case is suitable as it will keep the two parts from denting due to impact. However, a soft case is ideal on a low budget.

It would be better to go to a practice center to get a feel for different cues. This way, you will have other options depending on your budget and experience.

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